Medical Cannabis and Safety-Sensitive Jobs: Where can Employers Draw the Line?

Medical Cannabis and Safety-Sensitive Jobs: Where can Employers Draw the Line?

Much legal ink has been spilled over the past year about the impact of cannabis legalization on the workplace (see our overview here). At the end of the day, however, the basic rules of the game have not changed. Employees still cannot expect to attend at work while intoxicated. Employers can still insist on sobriety in the workplace. And safety-concerns regarding how to structure operations remain a foremost consideration in any workplace (and in fact are mandated by operation of the Occupational Health and Safety Act).

Ontario superior court confirms that frustration of contract is a two-way street

Ontario superior court confirms that frustration of contract is a two-way street

The legal doctrine of frustration of contract is well known to employment lawyers but its application is not all that intuitive to the average employer or employee. In the recent case of Hoekstra v. Rehability Occupational Therapy Inc., 2019 ONSC 562, the Ontario Superior Court of Justice was asked to revisit this doctrine and opine as to whether an employee, as compared to an employer, can ever assert frustration to end an employment relationship.

Off-Key? The Boston Symphony and Gender-Based Equality in Pay

Off-Key? The Boston Symphony and Gender-Based Equality in Pay

The size of an employee’s salary is often seen as an indicator of importance within an organization. Thus, when women are paid less than their male counterparts for performing similar work, it suggests that their efforts are somehow of lesser value. In Ontario, we have a number of legal mechanisms that are designed to reduce gender-based wage disparity, however, it remains a reality in far too many workplaces.

Arbitration Clause Illegal & Unconscionable: Uber Drivers Taken for a Ride

Arbitration Clause Illegal & Unconscionable: Uber Drivers Taken for a Ride

On January 2, the Court of Appeal for Ontario released its first decision of 2019: Heller v. Uber Technologies Inc. et al. While the new year is just getting started, this decision is likely to be one of the most significant from an employment law perspective. Its implications are far-reaching and raise novel compliance challenges for Ontario employers that contract to resolve workplace disputes by way of private arbitration.

Wrongful dismissal in Ontario: how do we calculate the value of lost benefits?

Wrongful dismissal in Ontario: how do we calculate the value of lost benefits?

When an employee is fired and not given sufficient notice, a common point of dispute becomes how to properly calculate the lost value of non-monetary benefits. Wages, by contrast, are a relatively simple affair. If a court orders the employee ought to have received an additional three (3) months’ notice, the parties need only calculate the value of three months’ wages and any resulting interest for the delay in payment.

Hold the Applause: Clapping Banned to Reduce Individual Anxiety

Hold the Applause: Clapping Banned to Reduce Individual Anxiety

Manchester may be best known for its premiership football teams and spawning the likes of Oasis and The Smiths, however, the City was in the headlines last month for something quite different: its Student Union (“MUSU”) voted to replace clapping at all of its events with “jazz hands” (i.e. the practice of waving open hands in the air).

Sweet Revenge: Business Ordered to Pay Children Minimum Wage for Selling Chocolates

Sweet Revenge: Business Ordered to Pay Children Minimum Wage for Selling Chocolates

This week on Twitter, our firm has been examining the minimum wage from a variety of perspectives. Using the hashtag #minimumwageweek, we shared content ranging from videos of famed economists such as Milton Friedman to historical articles on the original debate when Ontario’s minimum wage was first introduced in 1963.

Hit Rewind: Ford Government Reverses Bill 148 Changes to Ontario Employment Laws

Hit Rewind: Ford Government Reverses Bill 148 Changes to Ontario Employment Laws

On October 23, 2018 the Ford government presented Bill 47, the Making Ontario Open for Business Act. Bill 47 is set to repeal a large portion of Bill 148, the Fair Workplaces, Better Jobs Act, which was passed into law by the previous provincial government just 11 months ago.