Sweet Revenge: Business Ordered to Pay Children Minimum Wage for Selling Chocolates

Sweet Revenge: Business Ordered to Pay Children Minimum Wage for Selling Chocolates

This week on Twitter, our firm has been examining the minimum wage from a variety of perspectives. Using the hashtag #minimumwageweek, we shared content ranging from videos of famed economists such as Milton Friedman to historical articles on the original debate when Ontario’s minimum wage was first introduced in 1963.

Hit Rewind: Ford Government Reverses Bill 148 Changes to Ontario Employment Laws

Hit Rewind: Ford Government Reverses Bill 148 Changes to Ontario Employment Laws

On October 23, 2018 the Ford government presented Bill 47, the Making Ontario Open for Business Act. Bill 47 is set to repeal a large portion of Bill 148, the Fair Workplaces, Better Jobs Act, which was passed into law by the previous provincial government just 11 months ago.

Just cause for dismissal: context is key

Just cause for dismissal: context is key

Determining what conduct amounts to just cause for dismissal is no easy task. In part this is due to just cause being inherently situation specific. When describing what may constitute just cause, employment lawyers often refer to extreme examples: think of situations where a public-facing employee makes repeated racial slurs to a customer or commits major fraud in the course of their duties. Typically, such facts will prove fertile ground for successful assertions of just cause for dismissal by an employer.

When is Retraining a Reasonable Approach to Mitigating Loss of Employment?

When is Retraining a Reasonable Approach to Mitigating Loss of Employment?

As we have discussed in previous articles, if you are fired from work and decide to seek severance, you are required to take reasonable steps to find alternate comparable employment. This obligation is referred to as the “duty to mitigate” the loss of your employment.

Paying the price: Ontario court reminds employers to carefully consider their approach to litigation

Paying the price: Ontario court reminds employers to carefully consider their approach to litigation

Wrongful dismissal disputes are fairly common. In our experience they often resolve through negotiation and infrequently progress far into the litigation process. That said, sometimes cases of this nature do reach the court room and the parties usually fight over the quantum of severance sought, the type of payments claimed (i.e. bonus/commissions) and whether the former employee made reasonable efforts to find re-employment.

Rights and Responsibilities of Ontario Restaurant Owners and Employees

Rights and Responsibilities of Ontario Restaurant Owners and Employees

According to Restaurants Canada, the Canadian food service industry employs over 1.2 million people. With so many people involved in this industry, whether as franchise owners, professional chefs or part-time servers, it is important to be aware of the workplace rights and obligations that apply. The food services industry is in many ways unique, facing safety and cost challenges that many other sectors do not. With that in mind, we set out to provide an overview of some key employment rights and obligations:

Andrew Vey Interviewed by Global News

Andrew Vey Interviewed by Global News

Earlier this month, Vey Willetts lawyer Andrew Vey spoke with Global News about the novel implications of a recent Ontario court decision for sexual harassment complainants.