non-solicitation clause

Employee’s Attempt to Solicit Clients from Former Employer Proves Costly

Employee’s Attempt to Solicit Clients from Former Employer Proves Costly

Restrictive covenants (such as non-competition and non-solicitation clauses) are a common feature of many employment agreements. It is relatively rare, however, that companies resort to litigation to enforce these requirements by way of an injunction. This may be down to the costs associated with doing so, or that the required legal threshold to obtain an injunction is high.

Beware the “Courtesy Call”: Liability for breach of non-solicitation obligations

Beware the “Courtesy Call”: Liability for breach of non-solicitation obligations

A non-solicitation clause is a contractual requirement that serves to protect an employer from a departing employee’s attempts to recruit its staff or solicit business from its customers, clients or suppliers. At their root, these clauses are designed to protect the legitimate business interests of a company or organization, and to avoid unexpected loss in the event that staff depart.