When is Retraining a Reasonable Approach to Mitigating Loss of Employment?

When is Retraining a Reasonable Approach to Mitigating Loss of Employment?

As we have discussed in previous articles, if you are fired from work and decide to seek severance, you are required to take reasonable steps to find alternate comparable employment. This obligation is referred to as the “duty to mitigate” the loss of your employment.

Putting on the Brakes: Ontario courts are limiting the scope of post-dismissal mitigatory earnings

Putting on the Brakes: Ontario courts are limiting the scope of post-dismissal mitigatory earnings

A long-standing rule of wrongful dismissal cases is that employees who seek additional severance are required to look for new work post-dismissal. Employers are only obligated to pay monies for actual loss incurred beyond any statutory entitlement period.

Keep the Receipts: Dismissed Employee awarded $45,000 for job search expenses

Keep the Receipts: Dismissed Employee awarded $45,000 for job search expenses

Most people understand that if they lose their job, they have a right to receive severance from their employer. Generally speaking, what reflects fair severance for a person will depend on a number of factors such as whether the individual has a written employment contract, their age, their tenure of service, their formal education and the availability of comparable jobs in the local market.

Q&A: The Employee's Duty to Mitigate Loss

Mitigation is a legal concept and can be difficult to understand. With this in mind, this article seeks to lay out clearly what the duty to mitigate requires and what it may mean for you.