Andrew Vey

$750,000 in moral and punitive damages awarded to employee left to “twist in the wind”

$750,000 in moral and punitive damages awarded to employee left to “twist in the wind”

Before 2017 comes to a close, the Ontario Superior Court of Justice has provided at least one last case that is sure to catch the attention of employers. In a decision issued on December 7th, Justice Emery issued an award of $750,000 for moral and punitive damages to a senior managerial employee who effectively found herself benched for almost 10 months prior to her actual date of dismissal.

Wrongful dismissal – when does the limitation period clock start running?

Wrongful dismissal – when does the limitation period clock start running?

A recent decision from the Ontario Superior Court of Justice touches upon a little discussed area of employment law. Specifically, when does the limitation period clock start running for a claim of wrongful dismissal?

Paul Willetts Quoted in The Lawyer's Daily

Paul Willetts Quoted in The Lawyer's Daily

Vey Willetts lawyer Paul Willetts was quoted in the March 6, 2017 edition of The Lawyer's Daily in an article entitled "Big changes could be on Way for Ontario workplace landscape." The article discusses the provincial government's Changing Workplaces Review and some of the changes employees and employers in Ontario may expect to see. 

Paul Willetts Quoted by CBC on Workplace Relationships

Vey Willetts lawyer Paul Willetts was recently quoted by CBC News in an article titled "Hunter Tootoo admits to an 'inappropriate' relationship, but did he break any rules?"

In the article, Willetts discusses employee relationships and their impact on the workplace. Willetts notes that "there is no law on the books that prevents a consensual relationship. At the end of the day, this is really coming down to employers if they want to have a say in this kind of conduct, to put policies in place and to enforce those fairly."

Pokémon GO: A contemporary example of how new technology can impact the workplace

Pokémon GO: A contemporary example of how new technology can impact the workplace

By now you have likely heard of the new gaming phenomenon sweeping the globe: Pokémon GO. This is an augmented reality game that can be downloaded for free by anyone with a smartphone. 

In essence, Pokémon GO requires users to explore their local city with their phones. By visiting different areas, certain rewards or objectives can be received. The Pokémon (or digital creatures) can only be seen by users on their phone and are displayed over the camera picture of the local environment (thus the "augmented" nature of the game). This has led to some odd outcomes. For instance, a police station in Darwin Australia has had to tell players to keep out and catch Pokémon elsewhere. In another case, the National Holocaust Museum in Washington DC has been forced to remind visitors that it is not an appropriate venue for gaming.